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October, 2001 - Issue #5

 

BOB AND CAMILLE AT HOME ON MAUI

 

OCTOBER SHOWERS

This is the rainy season and when the showers let up on this day, we went for a walk down through an adjacent neighborhood.  The nice thing about rain in Hawaii is that it isn't very cold and it keeps things green

 

BRING FRUITS AND FLOWERS

 

Our carrots are a little strange looking - kind of pudgy and gnarled - but we eat them any way and celebrate the fact that they came from our own garden.  They are the fruits of our labors.  The Gerber Daisies are irrepressibly cheerful - they just pop out in front our our eyes and say,  "Hi There!!"

 

TURNING IT ALL INTO CALORIES

   

Here we are, playing in the kitchen again.  Bob is mixing up some pita dough and I'm holding a bowl of hummus.  Add a bit of baking time and some fresh vegetables and we have a meal.

 

OUR FIRST TRIP TO MOLOKAI

 

The west end of Molokai looks a lot like Kaho'olawe - dry, red and desolate,  Bob and I flew to this island October 15th so Bob could give a talk about Kaho'olawe's reconstruction program to a group of gardeners and then we took the rest of the day off and went sightseeing.  Molokai is the 7th of the 8 major Hawaiian Islands that we have visited.  The eighth island is Ni'ihau and is off-limits to most people in the same way that Kaho'olawe is.

Bob looks out to sea on the west side of Molokai.

 

Kalaupapa, the old Leper Colony that made Father Damian famous, from the cliffs above.  You can see why this was a good place to isolate victims of Hansens' Disease.  There was no way anyone was going to climb these cliffs and infect the rest of the island.  It was later discovered that only a small percentage of the population can "catch" leprosy.

 

Ancient Hawaiians constructed elaborate Fish Ponds and here is one that has been re-constructed.  We liked the sparkle of the sun on the water and the great cloud formations, too.

This is the definitive photo of Molokai - it is known for having the highest sea cliffs in Hawaii and perhaps in the world.

Kahana Rock and Mokuhooniki Island off the coast of Molokai.  I took this photo because of the clouds, the fence and the sun shining on Mokuhooniki.

Another fence and cloud shot, taken by Bob

 

HALAWA VALLEY - MOLOKAI

 

We drove all the way around the east end of the island, almost to where the road ends to have a look at one of the prettiest and most remote spots on Molokai.

 

COMPOSTING WORKSHOP

 

Here's Joy conducting her composting workshop on October 13th.  She is great!  Camille just joined the board of directors for Maui Recycling Group for which Joy is the Executive Director.

 

Inspired by the Workshop, we decided to try out Joy's "Lazy Method" for composting and bought two 20-gallon Rubbermaid bins with locking lids, a 5/8" drill bit and a paper shredder  that very day to handle all of our household waste paper and food scraps.  Here's Bob with the first bin after drilling all the holes in it.

 

First, the shredded paper and then the food waste goes into the bin.  It gets layered (like lasagna) until the bin is full and then it sits while the second bin is layered.  The first bin gets watered and rolled every weekend and will yield about 5 gallons of compost in the same amount of time it takes to fill the second bin.  This process will someday eliminate the need for us to buy compost for our garden.  Our contribution to the landfill is 70 gallons a month or less than half a cubic yard a month for a total of about 4 cubic yards a year.  THAT is why we are so proud of ourselves for implementing this new method of composting!

 

KIRC BOATHOUSE SITE INVESTIGATION WITH CHARLEY

 

Here's Charley looking at the home of some ferals (our name for homeless people) and at the cemented headstone of an old grave.  The homesteaders must be cleared off the property and the sacred site protected before any building can occur.  Charley is the KIRC's boat captain.  Bob and Camille met him at the KIRC's 8-acre site October 11th to begin planning of the boathouse.  It appeared to have been several weeks since these living quarters had been occupied.  Bob went in and picked up some prescription vials.

 

ADVENTURES ON HORSEBACK

 

Camille drove over to this trail riding barn to check it out after being invited by their manager, Diane St. Gaudens on October 10th.  The most telling measure of this barn's success was the contentment of their horses.  Camille is thinking of volunteering to exercise and massage several of these animals who have suffered aches and pains at the hands of tourists.  They are reducing the weight limit of riders from 225 to 200.

  

What a nice site for pastures and arena - overlooking the beautiful deep blue sea.

 

FIRST RESPONDER TRAINING AT MAUI SCRAP METAL

 

The local Fire Department killed two birds with one stone on October 9th  by practicing with the Jaws of Life on some junked automobiles to an audience of First Responder Trainees, including Bob and one class auditor, Camille.  Bob was taking this training because the KIRC is asking their employees to know how to save lives in an emergency in preparation for taking over the "tour guide" roles on Kaho'olawe in 2003.

 

These pictures are the artsy  result of Bob's wanderings during the demonstration and tell the story of the relationship between civilization and nature.  That's Lovely Iao Valley in the background, one of the wettest places on earth.

 

DON'T TELL ME WE'RE PLAYING WITH THE CAMERA IN THE MIRROR AGAIN!

 

Oh Boy!  Here we go again!  What a weird view of Camille's eye through the crystal ball October 7 (can you guess it?) - a Sunday.

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