TROUTS LATEST PHOTOS

June, 2003 - Issue #25

 

BOB AND CAMILLE AT HOME ON MAUI

 

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS

 

On the first day of June, Bob extends the salad garden by creating four more modular units.  These flower boxes of lettuce and greens will live and grow right outside the back door where they belong.

 

MEANWHILE

 

Cookie Bad Crumble makes some dough.

 

49 BIG ONES

On the fourth day of June, Camille turned 49 and poses here with some of her cards and gifts - pastel colored snap dragons from Mom, a chocolate layered birthday cake from Bob and champagne, chocolates, artichokes, a squash from the ranch and a bottle of red wine.  Someone might just be getting spoiled here!

 

TWO HEADS ARE BETTER THAN ONE

Bob thought this squash looked a bit like Richard Nixon.  What can I say except that the guy holding that squash sure is a good looking man!

 

HOME ON THE RANGE

We've been admiring this bull and his pasture mates from our front porch and decided to drive up and take a closer look.  This animal outweighs  our Volkswagen beetle by about 1,000 pounds.  A herd of spotted axis deer from India also share this pasture.  We watch them through our binoculars from our front porch.

 

WILMA AT  HOME

 

On the eighth day of June, Wilma invited us over to her house in Keokea for brunch.  She has a beautiful yard and a striking cat named Buddy.  Wilma is feeding Buddy seaweed treats in exchange for tricks which include sitting, lying down and rolling over.

 

NEW BEGINNING

 

Before and After - Wilma, her friend Lanny, Bob and Camille cleared a little spot for a vegetable garden before brunch.

 

TWO HANDSOME FELLOWS

 

Some animals sense that we find them attractive.  Both Buddy and Black Jack know exactly what to do when someone picks up a camera.   Buddy poses with the nonchalance that only cats can pull off.  Black Jack, a roman-nosed Percheron, protests being held back by his rider who tried in vain to prevent him from nosing his way into the picture.

 

CANE AND ABLE

 

Bob brought home this piece of sugar cane on the 11th day of June.  He showed Camille how to cut it up and suck the juice out for a refreshing snack.  This is one of the things Bob learned as a kid growing up in Africa.  Camille digs into the landscaping on June 13.

 

UPCOUNTRY FAIR

 

On the 15th day of June, we risked life and limb to walk over to the Upcountry Fair at the Eddie Tam Center on Makawao Avenue.  Sadly, few roads are made for strolling these days.   As you can see, there isn't much room to walk between the traffic and the real estate.  One of the booths at the fair belonged to Maui Celtic.  We see a lot of bumper stickers proclaiming Hawaiian Pride and are pleased to see a bit of European Pride as well.

 

DUSTING OFF THE OLD GUIDE SADDLE

Camille looks over Bob's saddle in the hopes that she can use it at work.  There had been a few rides lately where there were more guests than saddles and Camille had to ride in one of the kid-sized saddles.  After packing the first aid kit and the lunch onto a 13" saddle, there wasn't much room left for the guide.  Camille never did use Bob's saddle at work because it was too English looking for a Western trail ride.  Fortunately, the ranch has since invested in more saddles.

 

 SIGNS OF THE TIMES

Rainbows are always a good sign.  On June 18, we snapped this picture of a rainbow rising above the pastures at the Maui Horse Center.  When we moved we were afraid it would be too dry for us on this side of town.  We have been pleasantly surprised by plenty of rain.  Bob rigged up a rain barrel and we catch 30 gallons of water for every tenth of an inch of rainfall.  The rainwater grows great produce because it is full of minerals.  Further, it is missing chlorine and other wastewater treatment chemicals.  Notice that we have removed the Maui Recycling Service advertising from the back of the Bio Pod.

 

WELCOMING COMMITTEE

 

If Koa isn't tied up when we arrive home, he comes over and says hello as we get out of the car.  Bob took this picture of himself and Koa by crouching down and holding the camera at arm's length.  When John leaves the property, he tethers Koa to the clothesline in the back yard.  The vegetation surrounding Koa is bananas (top and center,) hibiscus (right,) sweet potatoes (foreground) and lilikoi (the vine in the left side of the photo.)  Koa has a dog house which he recently surrendered to a tiny kitten named Kai, the newest addition to John's family.

 

ROLE REVERSAL

 

Camille enjoys a glass of beer in front of her computer while Bob makes bread.  Bob is adding bread production to his many household chores in preparation for being between jobs next month.  Camille never needs to wear gloves for typing at this elevation.  The temperature is always between 65 and 80 degrees.

 

WET SADDLES

 

Bob joined a trail ride at Piiholo Ranch on June 24.  The guests check in at this pavilion which is decorated with a painted cow skull.  The first stop on the ride is Maliko Gulch.  The guide, Camille, sits atop a horse named Clyde and talks story as the guests peer into the gulch, 125 feet below.  Bob snapped this picture from atop Black Jack as you can see from the ears in the foreground.  The wet guests sit patiently while Camille describes how  Peter Baldwin's great-grandfather, Henry routed water into the ditch to irrigate the island's sugar cane fields.  The Hamakua Ditch System was completed in 1878.  It recently won a Historic National Engineering Award, putting it into the same class as the Panama Canal and the Golden Gate Bridge.

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